History

Sorrow and Remembrance

3% Of The Soldiers in the Red Army in 1941 Lived to Victory Day, 1945

Commemorate and Honor Over 7 Million Ukrainians in the World War II Soviet Army

Ukraine annually remembers victory at the end of World War II on May 8th the day before Russia celebrates victory with great shows of threatening military might.

Given the immense price Ukraine and the people of Ukraine paid both in fighting the war and for their territory being savaged throughout the war, Ukraine’s Victory Day is focused on remembering and honoring the human cost.

This year Peter Voitsekhovsky of the U.S.-Ukraine Foundation has produced a video “Sorrow and Remembrance.”

We hope you take the time to join us as we honor and remember yet another time the people of Ukraine paid an enormous price for freedom and liberty.

‎Michael Fishel of Virginia on his father, Borys Fishel (1924-)

"Since the Soviets controlled most of Ukraine at the start of World War II and since so many Ukrainians were serving in the military at the time, it is hardly surprising that they took part in the taking of the Reichstag (as referenced in the video), the impromptu meeting on the Elbe (the "Russian" officer often mentioned in those photo captions was actually from Ukraine), and other pivotal moments during the war.

“My father fought at Stalingrad, helped encircle von Paulus's army at Prokhorovka, took part in the war's largest tank battle near Kursk, saw the devastation of his home city of Kyiv (where members of our family were murdered by the Nazis at Babyn Yar), and went on to Berlin and Germany's defeat as a member of the First Ukrainian Front.

“For as long as I can remember, my father has avoided talking about the war. He did mention once that it was really scary, an admission that is more than understandable considering he was 17 years old when he saw his first action after volunteering to join a frontline unit in 1941.

“Based on his many decorations, my father was able to more than manage his fear.‎ He was wounded four times and still has shrapnel in his abdomen and one of his arms.

“My father bristles at the idea that he fought for Soviet dictator Stalin."

 

2020 May 8th, USUF Remembers with "Sorrow and Remembrance"

Sorrow and Remembrance

Commemorate and Honor Over 7 Million Ukrainians in the World War II Soviet Army

Ukraine annually remembers victory at the end of World War II on May 8th the day before Russia celebrates victory with great shows of threatening military might.

Given the immense price Ukraine and the people of Ukraine paid both in fighting the war and for their territory being savaged throughout the war, Ukraine’s Victory Day is focused on remembering and honoring the human cost.

This year Peter Voitsekhovsky of the U.S.-Ukraine Foundation has produced a video “Sorrow and Remembrance.”

We hope you take the time to join us as we honor and remember yet another time the people of Ukraine paid an enormous price for freedom and liberty.

‎Michael Fishel of Virginia on his father, Borys Fishel (1924-)

"Since the Soviets controlled most of Ukraine at the start of World War II and since so many Ukrainians were serving in the military at the time, it is hardly surprising that they took part in the taking of the Reichstag (as referenced in the video), the impromptu meeting on the Elbe (the "Russian" officer often mentioned in those photo captions was actually from Ukraine), and other pivotal moments during the war.

“My father fought at Stalingrad, helped encircle von Paulus's army at Prokhorovka, took part in the war's largest tank battle near Kursk, saw the devastation of his home city of Kyiv (where members of our family were murdered by the Nazis at Babyn Yar), and went on to Berlin and Germany's defeat as a member of the First Ukrainian Front.

“For as long as I can remember, my father has avoided talking about the war. He did mention once that it was really scary, an admission that is more than understandable considering he was 17 years old when he saw his first action after volunteering to join a frontline unit in 1941.

“Based on his many decorations, my father was able to more than manage his fear.‎ He was wounded four times and still has shrapnel in his abdomen and one of his arms.

“My father bristles at the idea that he fought for Soviet dictator Stalin."